Success Stories

A Veteran’s Story: How Doug Padgett Found Hope and a Way to be Heard Again

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can result in many different challenges from cognitive and behavioral changes, to physical complications. With a positive attitude, lots of hard work, the support of the VA and the experts at NeuroRestorative, Doug Padgett and other Veterans with TBI are able to live more independently.

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Fighting for Kathryn: How One Mother’s Actions Made a Difference

Typically a very methodical rider, Kathryn underestimated the last jump of the course and fell off of Bella, hitting her head. She was airlifted to the nearby University of Maryland’s Trauma Shock Hospital, and was diagnosed with a mild concussion and neck injury. But it wasn’t until nearly two years later that Kathryn was diagnosed with a TBI.

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Former-NFL Player Gene Breen’s “Playbook” for Quality of Life after Brain Injury

In the playbook, I was the quarterback, Dr. Horn was the coach, and Nancy and all the other therapists were my team. NeuroRestorative’s neurobehavioral programs help former athletes such as Gene Breen and other brain injury survivors get the care they need to manage their behaviors and improve their quality of life.

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Kevin’s Story: Achieving Independence Through Supported Living

NeuroRestorative’s expert therapists recognize that each individual is unique and work to incorporate the interests of the participant when developing their brain injury rehabilitation plan and ongoing support. Participants, like Kevin, are encouraged to engage in personal interests such as music or art, and the treatment team strives to develop opportunities for educational, recreational and community activities that reflect a participant’s interests throughout the rehabilitative process.

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Meet Blaine

NeuroRestorative’s supported living programs empower individuals, like Blaine, to be more independent by becoming contributing members of the community while still receiving the support they need to improve their quality of life. Since living at Governor Hall Place, Blaine has learned to independently manage his activities of daily living (ADLs) such as dressing and grooming himself. He has also learned how to better manage his behavior and emotions by taking the time to think about their consequences.

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